How to use Essentials In Writing?


Suggested Approach:

1. Look at the worksheet/assignment sheet for today’s lesson.
2. Watch the video lesson.
3. Complete the assignment.
4. Look at the next lesson.

In Detail:

1. Look at the worksheet/assignment sheet for the day’s lesson.

Looking at the assignment will help students be prepared for the content of the lesson. As they watch the video portion of the lesson, they will be listening in terms of what the assignment sheet will require.

2. Watch the video lesson.

Present the new concept to the student. Depending on the student, you may want to watch the lesson with the student, or you may allow the student to watch the lesson alone.

3. Complete the assignment.

Students will complete the worksheet or assignment sheet. During this time, it’s very important for students to “think out loud” as they complete the assignment. If this isn’t possible due to disturbance of other students, they may wait until they are finished and then explain the new concept to a third party.

Worksheets/assignment sheets are not considered optional.

4. Look at the next lesson.

Again, it’s important for students to be aware of what they will be learning.

This depends on the topic and the student. There are many different variables to consider in such a question. Typically, a good rule to follow is: Don’t complete the worksheets/assignment sheets unless the student understands the concepts presented in the video lesson. You may need to watch the video more than once. Then, students will complete the worksheet/assignment sheets after and understanding of the new concept is evident.
Video lessons and worksheets/assignment sheets are titled to correspond with each other by number. Additionally, written work titled “A” will be completed the first day (after watching the video), “B” the second day, “C” the third day, and so on. If a lesson only has “A” written work, move to the next video lesson the following day. Look at the example below for more details.

Day One

1. Look at Lesson 1A worksheet(s).
2. Watch Video Lesson 1.
3. Complete Lesson 1A written work. (Only if concept taught in video is understood.)
4. Student explains what he/she has learned.

Day Two

1. Look at Lesson 2A worksheet(s).
2. Watch Video Lesson 2.
3. Complete Lesson 2A written work. (Only if concept taught in video is understood.)
4. Student explains what he/she has learned.

Day Three

1. Complete Lesson 2B written work.

Day Four

1. Complete Lesson 2C written work.

Day Five

1. Look at Lesson 3A worksheet(s).
2. Watch Video Lesson 3.
3. Complete Lesson 3A written work. (Only if concept taught in video is understood.)
4. Student explains what he/she has learned.

Day Six

1. Complete Lesson 3B written work

Day Seven

1. Look at Lesson 4A worksheet(s).
2. Watch Video Lesson 4.
3. Complete Lesson 4A written work. (Only if concept taught in video is understood.)
4. Student explains what he/she has learned.

…AND SO ON

Another acceptable and easy method to score written compositions are checklists. While useful at any grade level, they are most suitable for paragraphs, personal letters, mini essays, etc. written by elementary students.
As I visit with homeschool parents, I find that there are many who struggle with grading written compositions such as narratives, essays, research papers, etc written by junior high and high school students. In the video below, I discuss the use of rubrics as a method of scoring such. Below the video, I posted a copy of the rubric used in the video.